Czech Food: a Fusion of Central European Cuisines

Traditional Czech food is not for the faint-hearted. An individual portion feeds the whole family and almost explodes with calories. On the bright side: Czech meals and Czech beer are a happy marriage. Traditional Czech food consists of pork or beef doused in a sauce and served with dumplings.

Meat is the mainstay of most dishes. Non-meat eaters no longer have a difficult time in Prague because almost all restaurants include vegetarian dishes. Czechs seem to be allergic to vegetables; only the smallest sliver of red pepper, the tiniest slice of tomato and half a gherkin accompany your main dish unless you order a salad as a main course.

Czech cuisine draws from German, Polish Hungarian and Austrian recipes. Almost every menu features goulash, grilled sausages, potato pancakes and roast pork with dumplings and cabbage. And finally, there is pivo! It is impossible to talk food without mentioning pivo (beer); bottom-fermented lager from the city of Plzeň (Pilsen) or one of the brews from the micro-breweries in Prague. Prague brims with beer garden where you can savour different types of beer. They each have their own distinctive flavour.

Chlebicky – Czech Open-faced Sandwiches

Each chlebíčky, open-faced sandwich is a single masterpiece, applied art at its best. They are easy to find: all delicatessen or delis whether in the centre or elsewhere in Prague have a large choice of chlebíčky. They are the ideal snack any time of day and cost next...

read more

Street Food in Prague

Street food is not very popular in Prague. Prague office workers have luncheon vouchers partly paid for by their employer and partly by themselves add to this a multitude of very affordable restaurants and you will understand why street food is not very common in...

read more

Prague Beer Capital of Europe

When in Prague, you need only ONE word: pivo and perhaps one more: pivnice. These two words are your passport to understanding Czech: beer and beer garden. Prague and beer go hand in hand. The Czechs drink an average of 150 liters beer per capita annually. This means...

read more

Wine, Absinthe and Becherovka

Czech wine is a distant second to Czech beer. Absinthe is illegal almost worldwide but not in Prague and Becherovka is good for the stomach. Wine, absinthe and Becherovka: three good grounds why to come to Prague. Another reason is the beer which the Czech call...

read more

Burcak Wine: the First Wine of the Season

The burcak wine season kicks off when the leaves start falling. All over Prague and Czechia burcak wine stalls appear. Burcak is the first wine of the season, the Czech answer to Beaujolais Nouveau. It is a partially fermented young Moravian wine and has a short...

read more

Becherovka: Herbal Liquer from Karlovy Vary

Becherovka is a popular drink. This herbal bitter is produced in the spa town of Karlovy Vary. In some(tourist) restaurants and pubs in Prague a glass of Becherovka is put on your table and looks like a welcome drink. But, be aware, it will feature on your bill! Every...

read more

Wine, Absinthe and Becherovka

Czech wine is a distant second to Czech beer. Absinthe is illegal almost worldwide but not in Prague and Becherovka is good for the stomach. Wine, absinthe and Becherovka: three good grounds why to come to Prague. Another reason is the beer which the Czech call...

read more

Chlebicky – Czech Open-faced Sandwiches

Each chlebíčky, open-faced sandwich is a single masterpiece, applied art at its best. They are easy to find: all delicatessen or delis whether in the centre or elsewhere in Prague have a large choice of chlebíčky. They are the ideal snack any time of day and cost next...

read more

Prague Beer Capital of Europe

When in Prague, you need only ONE word: pivo and perhaps one more: pivnice. These two words are your passport to understanding Czech: beer and beer garden. Prague and beer go hand in hand. The Czechs drink an average of 150 liters beer per capita annually. This means...

read more

Street Food in Prague

Street food is not very popular in Prague. Prague office workers have luncheon vouchers partly paid for by their employer and partly by themselves add to this a multitude of very affordable restaurants and you will understand why street food is not very common in...

read more

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This